Lesson Plan Revision

My first lesson plan was in Physical Education, which came as a bit of a surprise. The first week I was teaching, I didn’t expect that I would have to learn how to handle a group of children outside of a classroom environment. It was exciting to learn on the fly! However, as I am still learning, it is crucial that I take the time to reflect on how I could have made my lesson plan better. This page will be dedicated to improving and working on the first lesson plan I created, to demonstrate my ability to reflect and improve on my work. The first draft of the lesson plan is below:


Grade 7

Subject: Physical Education

Period Length: 40 minutes

Objective: To demonstrate the ability to sustain balance while being involved in fast-paced, fast-changing locomotor activities.

Outcome: PE7.6 Explore, apply, and communicate biomechanical concepts and principles of balance, stability, spin, and rotation as a means to enhance independence in learning motor skills involving locomotor (traveling), non-locomotor (non-traveling), and manipulative (moving objects) skills.

Indicators: Consider and explore the biomechanical concepts and principles of balance, stability, spin, and rotation to enhance movement used in alternate environment and body management activities.

Adaptive Dimension:

  • If students are too tired before the game is up, they will be asked to do stretches, such as toe touches and reaching for the sky.
  • If students do not have their gym clothes, they will still be asked to participate.

Preparation/Materials: Expectations will be written on the board, as well as a drawing of the gymnasium and where I need the students to sit when they are done their warm-up. An attendance list, and two Elephant Skin balls for the two Pac-Man players are needed for the activity.

Prerequisite Learning: Basic pivot movements will be discussed from their previous unit in basketball.

Presentation Classroom Management
Set: (5 minutes)–          Ask students if they have heard of or played Pac-Man.

–          Go over expectations on the board. (See attached sheet for expectations.)

–          Students will be asked to go to the change rooms, complete a warm up of two running laps around the gym and ten jumping jacks, and then to be seated in the middle of the gymnasium.

–          We will clap twice to get the students’ attention. If they do not quiet down, I will tell them that the longer they take to settle down, the longer it will take to get to the gym. When they are quiet, I will begin the lesson.
Development: (30 minutes)–           After students finish their warm-ups and are seated, the Pac-Man game will be explained, along with the rules. (See attached sheet.) Any questions will be addressed before the game starts.

–          The first and last name on the attendance list will decide the first two students to play as “Pac-Man.” These students start in the middle, each with an elephant ball, while the rest of the students may choose a starting line around the rest of the gym.

–          Throughout the game, I will yell out different types of movement, such as skipping, hopping, or grapevine (among others) to increase the difficulty of the game. Students may be restricted to certain colours of lines (ie. Only red and blue lines).

–          Whenever a student is tagged by the ball, they have to do 5 jumping jacks outside of the lines, then join the game again.

–          Every few minutes, the next top and bottom name on the attendance list will be called to be the new Pac-Man.

–          Any inappropriate behavior (such as shoving other students or throwing the ball) will be addressed by reminding the student(s) of the rules of the game. If poor behavior persists, they may be pulled from the game.
Closure (5 minutes):–          The game will go on until 2:50pm, at which time students will be asked to cool down by walking two laps around the gym, then changing and heading back to class.

Assessment:  Students will be assessed on their engagement and participation in the activity, and their personal effort put towards the different levels of movement throughout the game.

List of Expectations:

  • Go to the change rooms quietly. You have 3 minutes!
  • Once in the gym, run 2 laps and do 10 jumping jacks
  • Sit quietly in the middle of the gym when you are finished your warm-up

The Game, Pac-Man:

Two students get a red elephant skin ball and get to play as “Pac-Man.” They must tag other students by tapping them with the red ball.

Other students have to run around the gym, but are only allowed to run on certain lines, or move along the lines in certain ways (jumping, skipping, only on the left foot, etc.)

Every few minutes or so, the red ball switches off to two other students at random, so every student gets a chance to be Pac-Man.

Rules:

  • No pushing other players
  • No cheating (running in-between the lines)
  • Do not throw the ball
  • Do not use other students as a shield

Five jumping jacks if:

  • They step off the line
  • They get tagged
  • They are caught cheating

Professional Target:

Name: Frances Kurtenbach

Date: Feb 11th, 2015

Topic: Classroom management

Cooperating Teacher: _____________

Intention: Deal with any minor disruptions without losing confidence or stopping the flow of the lesson.

Steps to achieve target: Demonstrate non-verbal communication. For example: pausing, raising eyebrows, gesturing or making eye contact with disruptive students, walking towards them, reminding, or telling them to stop.

Observer: Watch to see that I demonstrate these non-verbal techniques in reminding students to be respectful listeners in the class.

Data Collection: (Observations made)

Whistle for next time; the directions were hard to hear at times. Also, lots of students handed in sick notes today, so next time maybe have something prepared for those students to do so that they’re not sitting on the bench and doing nothing. It’s better for them to have something to do so that they don’t get in a habit of handing in sick notes just to avoid having to do anything.


Lesson plan available for download below:

ECS300 – PHYS ED lesson plan


My lesson went well (details are here), but there were some aspects that needed improving. Here is the revised version:


Grade 7

Subject: Physical Education

Period Length: 40 minutes

Objective: To demonstrate the ability to sustain balance and endurance while being involved in fast-paced, fast-changing locomotor activities.

Outcome: PE7.6 Explore, apply, and communicate biomechanical concepts and principles of balance, stability, spin, and rotation as a means to enhance independence in learning motor skills involving locomotor (traveling), non-locomotor (non-traveling), and manipulative (moving objects) skills.

Indicators: Explore a variety of styles of movement to test agility, as well as stability and endurance, to improve in fast-paced body management activities for extended periods of time.

Adaptive Dimension:

  • If students are too tired before the game is up, they will be asked to do stretches, such as toe touches and reaching for the sky.
  • Students may walk laps around the gym if they are too tired.
  • Students who have sick notes and asked to not participate will be given one of the following assignments to work on:
    • Write a paragraph on why they think physical activity is crucial to their own health.
    • Work on other homework assignments.
    • Will have to help me decide on what type of movement the students have to incorporate next.
  • If students do not have their gym clothes, they will still be asked to participate.

Preparation/Materials: Expectations will be written on the board, as well as a drawing of the gymnasium and where I need the students to sit when they are done their warm-up. An attendance list, and two Elephant Skin balls for the two Pac-Man players are needed for the activity.

Prerequisite Learning: Basic pivot movements will be discussed from their previous unit in basketball.

Presentation Classroom Management
Set: (5 minutes)– Go over expectations on the board. (See attached sheet for expectations.) If the period takes place after recess, we will go over these expectations before recess so that they know to wait in the classroom before proceeding to the gymnasium.

–  Students will be asked to go to the change rooms, complete a warm up of two running laps around the gym and ten jumping jacks, and then to be seated in the middle of the gymnasium.

–  We will clap twice to get the students’ attention. If they do not quiet down, I will tell them that the longer they take to settle down, the longer it will take to get to the gym. When they are quiet, I will begin the lesson.
Development: (30 minutes)–  After students finish their warmups and are seated, the Pac-Man game will be explained, along with the rules. (See attached sheet.) Any questions will be addressed before the game starts. For students who learn better through visual cues and examples, I will ask a student who feels as though they understand the game to quickly demonstrate it with me.

– The first and last name on the attendance list will decide the first two students to play as “Pac-Man.” These students start in the middle, each with an elephant ball, while the rest of the students may choose a starting line around the rest of the gym.

–  Throughout the game, I will periodically blow a whistle to get the students to stop, then choose a different type of movement, such as skipping, hopping, or grapevine (among others) to increase the difficulty of the game. Students may be restricted to certain colours of lines (ie. Only red and blue lines).

–  Whenever a student is tagged by the ball, they have to do 5 jumping jacks outside of the lines, then join the game again.

– Every few minutes, the next top and bottom name on the attendance list will be called to be the new Pac-Man.

–  Any inappropriate behavior (such as shoving other students or throwing the ball) will be addressed by reminding the student(s) of the rules of the game. If poor behavior persists, they may be pulled from the game and will be seated on the bench.
Closure (5 minutes):–  The game will go on until 2:50pm, at which time students will be asked to cool down by walking two laps around the gym, then changing and heading back to class.

Assessment:  Students will be assessed on their engagement and participation in the activity, and their personal effort put towards the variety of movement throughout the game.

Download here:

ECS300 – PHYS ED lesson plan revised


There are a few things I’ve changed. Starting from the top, I’ve changed the objective and the indicators to something a little more understandable. I’ve also refocused the indicator. Thinking back on the activity, it had less to do with complicated movements than it had to do with endurance. The students were exploring different types of movement for a prolonged period of time while trying to evade “Pac-Man.” I’ve altered the indicator to make this more obvious. I’ve also added more adaptive dimensions. When I first taught this lesson, I forgot to tell the students about the first adaptive dimension listed, that if they got tired, they could move off to the side and do some stretched. As a result, the students got quite tired and slowed down a lot because they didn’t know they had any other option other than to keep running away from Pac-Man. I also thought of the fact that some students would rather walk than do stretches. So instead, I added another adaptive dimension that gives students the options to either do stretches, or walk a few laps around the gymnasium to get their breath back. This was a simple detail to add, but it can mean  a lot to the students.

The next adaptive dimension that I added addressed the second problem I faced when I taught the lesson. A lot of students had sick notes, and apparently these students have handed in a lot of sick notes. So, my cooperating teacher suggested that I have an activity prepared for the students who hand in sick notes. This is for two reasons:

1) Students might actually be sick but what to participate and have something to do.

2) Students may be fit enough to participate, but they just don’t want to. This gives them less incentive to not participate in gym due to possible laziness.

Of course there are always going to be exceptions, but these two reasons are common occurrences that teachers need to be prepared for. Instead of these students sitting out, they are given the option to participate in the activity by contributing ideas for movement, or they can work on homework, or they have to write a paragraph about the importance of physical education, to remind them that it’s important to be healthy. It’s always important to have options for the students to choose from. Additionally, I included that I would do a demonstration of the game with another student, to help those who learn better through visual cues and examples. This is how I added one type of differentiation to my lesson plan.

My biggest problem that I ran into when I taught this lesson, was because their phys-ed class took place after recess. After recess was over, most of the students just went straight to the gym, which meant I wrote the expectations on the board for nothing. To prevent that from happening again, I included in my set to remind students before recess that I want them to meet me back in the classroom and not go straight to the gymnasium. That way I can make sure I have a little more control over the class. When I got to the gymnasium, the students were running around playing basketball instead of doing the 2-lap, 10-jumping jacks warm-up I had written on the board for them.

Last but not least, I will use a whistle next time. Yelling over the excitement of the students was difficult, and half the time the students could not hear my instructions. Based on the advice of my cooperating teacher, I got a whistle, so the next time I teach Physical Education, the students will know when they have to stop and listen to instructions.


Treaty Content:

Unfortunately, my lesson plan did not include Treaty content whatsoever. Initially, I didn’t include such content because it seemed a dangerous line to tread on. I wanted the students to engage in some sort of physically demanding activity, and to role play something to do with Treaty content, but it seemed to be something that could very easily be borderline racism. When I was in elementary school, I had a teacher separate the students into two groups for a dodge ball game, where one group was the “cowboys,” and the other group was the “Indians.” It was incredible inappropriate. I did not want to do something offensive. I didn’t understand how I could incorporate a higher-thinking aspect to a physical activity that somehow had something to do with Treaty education. It wasn’t until after my ECS300 class had my classmates and I do a Treaty-related activity that I got an idea.

My idea would teach the concept of privilege and hopefully empathy. I would ask two or three students to volunteer to be “it,” while the rest of the class would have to run away. It would still be line tag, but as the game progressed, the students who have to run away are allowed to run on fewer and fewer lines, and their movement becomes more difficult than the two or three students who are “it.” Towards the end of the period, I will get the students to stop, do their cool-down laps, then gather around to have a quick discussion. I will ask them how it felt to be given difficult situations, and still be expected to run away from those who were it. We will talk about how the 2-3 students had more resources and privilege than the rest, and it was unfair that they had less restrictions than the others. I would then relate it to the concept of the European settlers coming to Canada and how the treaties led to offering money to the First Nations (despite how meaningless it was at the time) in exchange for their land.  As the settlers took over more and more of Canada, the First Nations had more and more taken away from them. It would be a metaphor for the idea that the First Nations were put into a disadvantage, then essentially told to “make-do” with what they had. It was clearly wrong, and the activity would help the students feel that unfairness, which will hopefully help them have a more emotional interaction with Treaty education. If I did the activity in this way, I would also ask students to do a sort of follow-up assignment. After getting back to class, they could write a short response on what they’ve learned through the activity, to get the students thinking critically.

Hopefully after revising this lesson I get another chance to teach it, but next time I will incorporate more adaptive dimensions, differentiation, and Treaty content. It is always important to be reflecting on lesson plans and teaching strategies to ensure you are benefiting all of your students in ways that work for you and for them.

Thanks for reading,

Frances

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